f1d0

2018.02.17 20.55

180123
Dance Helps

170424
creating The Mouse

151224
Chinese Food

151222
Mandy Patinkin's Lesson

151208
Racism by John Metta

151207
Turn Down the Volume

150830
DuPont

150707
Heroes

150626
Barista Flirting

150405
Browser Loses Downloads

150306
Pets In Memoriam

150202
Remove Vosteran

150201
Build a Computer

141231
New Year's Eve

141226
Boxing Day

140815
Stx in the news

140414
In Praise of Meatloaf

140327
Side Effects

140326
exercise induced pulmonary edema

140112
Uncle Seeley

131012
Who Will Reunite Toronto?

130115
Telomerase and Ageing

121231
Salmon

121220
Isolated Day Off

121219
Sandy Hook Shooting

121007
Toronto the Orange

121004
Winning Solitaire

120813
Learning about Android

120728
Car2go

120618
Convocation

120617
Father's Day 2012

120117
Lockdown (article)

111225
RIP Coralee Whitcomb

111201
In Praise of Crap

110920
In Praise of Idleness

110918
Love After 70 (snapjudgment)

110917
Thornhill Fair

110901
Bees in the Garbage

110814
Memories of the EeePC

110626
Legendary Customer Service

110403
to Newmarket and back

101206
borrowing Ti Gar

101005
the oatmeal

100928
three songs

100920
small towns

100919
best dollar stores

100918
KW day two

100917
Waterloo via Galt

100914
Facebook Humbug

020502
Chicken (a story)


110400
2011apr to 2012dec

100800
august-september 2010

100300
march 2010

091200
december 2009

090800
august 2009

090600
june 2009

090400
april 2009

090300
march 2009

index2006
back to 2005-2006

index2004
back to 2003-2004

archive
unmodified old essays and pix

180123 Dance Helps

Curious Mind Mag 2018 Jan
Mary Wright

According to a study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Journal, people who are physically active can slow down their brain's aging process. Neuroscientists behind this study say that dancing is the most effective physical activity.

So, why is dancing the most effective exercise for slowing down the aging process of the brain?

According to Dr Kathrin Rehfeld, the lead author of the study, physical exercise has an effect of slowing down and even preventing the decline in both the mental and physical activity in the brain that comes with its natural aging process.

In their study, they prove that 2 different types of physical activity - dancing and endurance training - both increase the brain's area that declines over time as we age. But, only dancing has proved to be effective when it comes to changes in behavior due to the noticeable improvements in balance.

The researchers selected 52 elderly volunteers aged 63-80 years for the purpose of the study. Then, they divided them randomly into two groups, one group was assigned to join dance classes, and the other group joined the sports control group.

The dance group took dance lessons with a constant change of choreography which moves they were asked to memorize. The program for the sports group, on the other hand, consisted of strength training, endurance training, and flexibility training.

The hippocampus area of the brain which is the most susceptible to decline because of the aging processes has increased in both groups. This area of the brain is also responsible for memory, balance, as well as learning.

But, only volunteers in the dance group had an increased volume of other subparts in the left hippocampus. Moreover, only dancing had increased the volume of one part in the right hippocampus called the subiculum.

This study proved that dancing, especially when followed by a change in choreography, is indeed superior to repetitive physical activities such as walking or cycling.

Dr Rehfeld further explains that they provided the participants in the dance group with different music genres. They changed the dance routine every second week and they introduced new arm-patterns, formations, steps, rhythms and different speed levels.

What about those who have two left feet and no sense of rhythm?

Try to lose yourself in the music and don't think about how awkward and funny you might look. Because music indeed has many therapeutic benefits - it lifts our spirit and increases our happiness levels.

"I believe that everybody would like to live an independent and healthy life, for as long as possible. Physical activity is one of the lifestyle factors that can contribute to this, counteracting several risk-factors and slowing down the age-related decline. I think dancing is a powerful tool to set new challenges for body and mind, especially in older age," explains Dr Rehfield.

youtu.be/76rONH4vLDc

curiousmindmagazine.com/neuroscientists-finally-revealed-number-one-exercise-slowing-aging-process/

www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00305/full
www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00305/pdf

hat tip to Syndi for the FB share  

2015 is upon us.